Tag: Canadian Citizenship

Navigating Canadian Citizenship with Limited Documentation: A Guide for Aspiring Citizens


Canadian Citizenship – New Amendment for Second Generation


CITIZENSHIP AMENDMENT NEWS

We are thrilled to bring you news of a significant update in Canadian citizenship rules, particularly in relation to double descent. If you were born outside Canada, and previously applied for Canadian citizenship through a parent, this announcement holds great importance for you, as you are now eligible to pass on your Canadian citizenship to your children.

The coming amendments to The Canadian Citizenship Act will introduce provisions that allow individuals who acquired their citizenship through descent to extend this privilege to their children, even if the offspring are born outside of Canada. This marks a progressive step forward in recognizing and facilitating the seamless transmission of Canadian citizenship to the next generation. First-generation individuals do not necessarily need to possess citizenship themselves to transmit it to the second generation.

The recent changes in Canadian citizenship regulations signify the government’s commitment to inclusivity and the acknowledgment of the evolving nature of families in our globalized world. By allowing individuals to pass on their citizenship to children born outside of Canada, these amendments reflect a more contemporary and inclusive approach to citizenship laws.

In the wake of this significant announcement and the subsequent changes, numerous questions undoubtedly arise. Our aim is to furnish you with comprehensive information to facilitate your understanding and guide you seamlessly through the process. This article will delve into the essence of Canadian citizenship, elucidate the steps to obtain it under the new regulations, outline the necessary prerequisites, and provide a wealth of valuable insights to assist you on this transformative journey.

What are the benefits of becoming Canadian?

Right to Vote: Canadian citizens have the right to participate in federal, provincial, territorial, and municipal elections. This allows them to have a say in the democratic process and contribute to shaping the policies of their community and country.

Quality Education: Canada is known for its high-quality education system, with many universities ranking among the top in the world. By studying in Canada, students can gain access to quality education that can enhance their career prospects globally. As a Canadian you would be subject to domestic fees instead of international fees and as you can see from the comparison chart below, fees for a domestic student in Canada is markedly lower than that of an international student.

COUNTRY TUITION PER YEAR LIVING EXPENSES PER YEAR
Canada $7,076 CAD (Domestic) $15,500-$17,800
Canada $20,000-$45,000 (International) $15,500-$17,800
United States $32,000-$60,000 (Domestic) $18,000-$25,000
United Kingdom $17,000-$43,000 (International) $21,700
Australia $45,000 (International) $16,700

Unrestricted Travel: Canadian citizens can travel freely in and out of Canada without the need for a Canadian visa (TRV) or residency permit.

Security Clearance: Canadian citizens have easier access to certain jobs that require security clearances, particularly those within the government or industries with sensitive information.

Economic Benefits: Citizens have access to certain government benefits, scholarships and programs that are not available to permanent residents or non-citizens, including various social assistance programs, grants, and subsidies.

Eligibility for Government Jobs: Some government positions in Canada may require Canadian citizenship. By becoming a citizen, you may have more opportunities to apply for and secure government jobs.

Army Enrollment: To enroll in the Canadian Armed forces you must be a Canadian citizen at least 17 years old (with parental consent) or 18 years old (without parental consent), and meeting certain medical and fitness standards.

No Residency Obligations: Unlike permanent residents, citizens do not have to meet any residency requirements to maintain their status in Canada.

Right to Run for Office: Canadian citizens have the right to run for political office at the municipal, provincial, and federal levels, allowing them to actively participate in shaping the country’s future.

Passport and Travel: Canadian citizens are eligible to apply for a Canadian passport, which facilitates international travel. The Canadian passport is widely regarded as a strong travel document, providing visa-free or visa-on-arrival access to many countries.

Dual Citizenship: Canada allows dual citizenship, so individuals can retain citizenship in another country while becoming Canadian citizens.

Sponsorship of Family Members: As a Canadian citizen, you may have the ability to sponsor family members for immigration to Canada, helping them to join you in Canada.

Retirement: Retiring in Canada as a Canadian citizen ensures access to various government benefits and programs designed to support seniors, including tax credits, healthcare subsidies, and transportation discounts.

Purchasing Property: As a Canadian citizen, you have the right to purchase property in Canada without any restrictions. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s government acted to prohibit non-Canadians from buying residential real estate in 2022, with the measure to expire on Jan. 1, 2025. That date has now been moved to Jan. 1, 2027.

Renting as a Canadian: While there should be no real price disparity between renting as a Canadian versus a non Canadian you still have to take into account the other benefits you get as a Canadian that would potentially allow you to secure longer term contracts due to your permanent status.

Access to Consular Assistance: Canadian citizens have access to consular services and assistance from Canadian embassies and consulates when traveling or residing abroad.

Cultural Integration: Citizenship fosters a sense of belonging and integration into Canadian society, including participation in cultural events and community activities.

Protection from Deportation: Citizens cannot be deported from Canada, except in rare cases where citizenship was obtained fraudulently.

Greater Sense of Belonging: Obtaining citizenship can provide a sense of belonging and permanence in Canada, contributing to emotional and psychological well-being.

FAQ’S

Will I lose my citizenship of birth?

While most countries recognize dual citizenship, there are a few that still do not.

Canada does recognize it so if you become Canadian, it does not mean you have to forfeit your other citizenship; however, if the country you were born in does not recognize it then they may make you relinquish that citizenship.

You must make sure you are aware of the rules and regulations of your country of birth with regards to dual citizenship.

If you chose Canada as your home, then becoming Canadian is the final step to take, and with one of the highest percentages of immigrants that obtain citizenship, the statistics speak for themselves.

I applied for my first citizenship certificate through my parents. Will it be the same application?

Although we cannot definitively predict whether the forms and procedures will remain unchanged, we can reasonably infer from past observations up until 2009. During that period, the process for applying for a first citizenship certificate through a grandparent did not deviate from the standard citizenship application.

Does the first generation born abroad need to have citizenship for the second generation to have it?

First-generation individuals do not necessarily need to possess citizenship themselves to transmit it to the second generation. Proof of the grandparents’ citizenship, coupled with the familial link to the children and grandchildren, would suffice to establish eligibility.

Would I need to get my grandparents’ birth certificate?

The grandparent’s birth certificate holds utmost significance in substantiating the eligibility of the parents and, subsequently, the grandchildren. While short-form certificates are acceptable for grandparents, the long-form versions are required for parents and grandchildren to demonstrate the familial connection.

Does it make a difference where I live when I apply for citizenship?

Your residential location will not impact your application. The application is submitted through the Canadian embassy that serves the country of your residence.

How long will it take?

Processing times for citizenship vary greatly and can change frequently. It’s always best to check the current processing for citizenship certificate. For first-time citizenship certificates, there is always an additional 6 months to add to normal processing time.

At present, a definitive date for the implementation of the new amendment remains pending, but as soon as there is news, we will announce it. If you have grandparents who were born in Canada and you believe you are eligible, then get in touch with one of our team members.

Book Appointment

Ottawa Embraces Inclusivity: Court Ruling Strikes Down Limit on Passing Citizenship to Children Born Abroad


Victory for ‘Lost Canadians’ as Ontario Court Ends Two Classes of Citizenship


The Queen’s Passing And Her Impact On Canada


Queen Elizabeth II Postage Stamp

Proof of Canadian Citizenship Certificate Processing Times Increase Drastically in 2021


proof of canadian citizenship certificate

Why Should I Become A Canadian Citizen?


Canadian Citizenship